ASCE St. Louis Section Landmarks

This page provides information about designated Civl Engineering Landmarks in the St. Louis Section's area. You can view a list of the Landmarks, see them on a Google (TM) custom map, or find GPS coordinates to help direct you to selected locations.

Table 1. List of Landmarks
Click on the project title or photo to see a related slideshow.

1. NEW CLARK BRIDGE, OCEA St. Louis Section 1994 Cable-stayed design; 756-foot main span; 4620 feet total length; carries U.S.67 over Mississippi River to Alton, IL. Featured in the NOVA documentary “The Super Bridge.”

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2. GRAND WATER TOWER Completed in 1871, 154-foot tower was part of the St. Louis water system, to relieve pressure surges; retired in 1912. Described as “the only perfect Corinthian column of its size in the world.”

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3. CHAIN OF ROCKS WATER PURIFICATION PLANT, NHCEL Completed in 1894; the filtration plant was built in 1915, and was the largest of its type in the world at that time.

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4 & 5. COMPTON HILL RESERVOIR AND WATER TOWER RENOVATION, OCEA St. Louis Section 1999. Newest of St. Louis’ standpipe water towers, completed in 1898; 179 feet tall; taken out of service in 1929; in National Register of Historic Places. The reservoir was completed in 1871, and expanded in the early 1900’s. The renovation included 2 new 14- million gallon concrete tanks, pipes, controls, and treatment of sinkholes in the limestone below the tanks

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6. POPLAR STREET BRIDGE, carries I-64,I-55 and I-70 over the Mississippi River. Completed in 1967, it was the first major orthotropic-plate, deck girder bridge in the U.S. Total length of five spans is 2614 feet

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7. ENVIRONMENTAL RIVER ENGINEERING ON THE MISSISSIPPI. OCEA St. Louis Section 1995.

This 20-year project is the first of its kind on the Mississippi River, uses innovative structures to maintain safe, depend-able navigation while positively impacting the environment.

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8. EADS BRIDGE, NHCEL Constructed between 1867 and 1874, first bridge over the Mississippi River below the Missouri River at St. Louis; 517-foot center span, 497- foot side spans; first chromium-alloy steel bridge, pioneered use of pneumatic caissons.

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9. BUSCH MEMORIAL STADIUM One of the first multi-purpose stadiums. Built 1964 to 1966, closed October 2005 and demolished that year to complete the new stadium.

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10. GATEWAY ARCH, National OCEA 1967. Begun 1961, topped out in 1965; 630 feet tall and spans 630 feet; weighted centenary arch.

 

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11. JEFFERSON BARRACKS BRIDGES, completed in 1984 and 1986; tied arch design; Total length of 4018 feet; 910-foot main span; carries I-255 over the Mississippi River.

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12. BISSELL POINT WATER TREATMENT PLANT, OCEA St. Louis Section 1996, provides secondary treatment for average of 150 million gallons per day. Cost was $280 million.

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13. EDWARD JONES DOME STADIUM, opened November 1995, seats 67,000 for football; 21 stories tall; two main trusses are 726 feet long, 65 feet high; roof area is 12 acres.

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14. UNION STATION, NHCEL Completed in 1894, it was considered the largest railroad station in the world at that time.

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15. ANHEUSER BUSCH BREWERY Brew House constructed 1891-92, 6 stories high, originally consisting of 6 kettles producing 1.8 million barrels yearly. It has been expanded over the years to produce 15.8 million barrels as of 2007.

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16. MELVIN PRICE LOCK & DAM replaced Lock & Dam No. 26 at Alton, IL. Construction began 1979 and was completed 1994; 1,200-ft main lock, 600-ft aux. lock; 1,160-ft long dam with 9 tainter gates. (Photo on the poster shows the cofferdam for constructing themain lock.)

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17. ST. LOUIS FLOODWALL PROJECT, completed in 1974, was awarded the Distinguished Design Award by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Total project includes 11 miles of floodwall and levee and 29 pumping stations.

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18. METROLINK LIGHT RAIL SYSTEM, OCEA St. Louis Section 1997. ST. CLAIR CO. ILLINOIS EXTENSION, OCEA St. Louis Section 2001.

The original system had 19 stations, 17 miles, connecting the airport, three universities, downtown St. Louis, and East St. Louis via Eads Bridge, which was rehabilitated. System has been extended to include 46 miles and 37 stations.

 

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19. RIVER DES PERES SEWERAGE& DRAINAGE PROJECT, NHCEL

Construction began April 1924, to control flooding and to remove sewage from the river. The original plan was completed in 1933. (Photo shows the construction of twin-arch sewers in Forest Park.)

You can download a history of the River Des Peres here (courtesy Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District).

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20. WAINWRIGHT BUILDING

Designed by Louis Sullivan and constructed in 1891, it is considered the “father of the contemporary skyscraper.” It has a steel frame instead of load-bearing masonry walls, which permitted large windows and open, spacious interiors.

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WHERE TO FIND THEM

We've created a custom Google(TM) map (below) to help you locate historical civil engineering landmarks and other notable civil engineering points of interest. For best results, click on the square brackets symbol in the upper right corner of the map to see the map in a full page and have improved control of the display and search options. You can zoom and pan to any of the points marked on the map. Click on the marked points to see basic information and additional links that will lead you to more information about the projects.

GEOCACHING/WAYMARKING TO NOTABLE CIVIL ENGINEERING SITES
(under construction, ideas welcome)