Welcome to the Central Pennsylvania Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers


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Job Postings

Job opportunities are available from Section Sponsors, they can be viewed here.

 


Report Card for Pennsylvania's Infrastructure Featured Category - Freight Rail

246 Million Tons of Freight is expected to pass through PA by 2035.

 

Pennsylvania’s 64 freight railroads operate on 5,604 miles of track across the state, ranking it the 4th largest rail network by mileage in the U.S. By 2035, 246 million tons of freight is expected to pass through the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, an increase of 22% over 2007 levels. Pennsylvania’s railroad freight demand continues to exceed current infrastructure. Improvements such as double stacking, addition of parallel tracks, and larger transfer facilities would help improve capacity.  Despite competing interest, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation's Freight Rail Bureau has continued to procure impressive levels of freight infrastructure funding, which directly or indirectly supports multi modal transportation projects throughout the Commonwealth. This public funding is in addition to all private support committed. It has further produced the most comprehensive state rail plan to date, with a strong emphasis on understanding stakeholders and their needs.

 

Read more here and don't forget to use this link to tell your elected officials about the Report Card.

 


Report Card for Pennsylvania's Infrastructure Featured Category - Levees

With the average age of levees in Pennsylvania approaching the typical design life of a levee system, further action is needed to keep Pennsylvanians safe from flooding.

 

With two new levee systems in Bloomsburg and Mt. Carmel constructed since 2014, and five new systems and seven rehabilitations currently under design, Pennsylvania is expanding and modernizing its levee infrastructure. Meanwhile, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) substantially improved its online National Levee Database and over the past four years has expanded the National Levee Safety Program to include inspections of non-state, non-Federal levees and a hazard potential classification system.  Yet, there is a growing need to rehabilitate aging levee systems, an often-underappreciated threat to flood-prone communities, and a need to re-evaluate levee designs based on outdated flood frequency statistics. In addition, municipalities which own and manage most levees often lack expertise needed to expedite needed rehabilitations.  With the average age of levees in Pennsylvania approaching the typical design life of a levee system, further action is needed to keep Pennsylvanians safe from flooding.